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Is Gel Blasting Legal? | All You Need To Know

Gel Blasting Legal

Welcome to the world of gel blasting! Put a day out shooting at friends on your post-Covid bucket list, you’re in for a world of fun!
Gel blasting is a relatively new entry into the Close Quarters Battle (CQB) type game. Similar to paintball and airsoft, you shoot gel balls at the opposing team.


Gel balls hurt way less than paintballs and are almost all water with biodegradable polymers.
Gel blasting is a relatively new game played in a CQB (Close Quarters Battle) skirmish. It is similar to paintball but follows an airsoft-like honour-based game, as players show no signs of getting shot.


Gel blaster guns shoot 7 to 8mm biodegradable gel balls. They cause less pain if hurt as compared to paintballs and are made up of water.
Although gel blasters are safe to use and have less impact on the body. Protective eyewear or safety goggles is the only protection necessary.

There is some controversy surrounding the irresponsible use of gel blaster guns, causing them to be illegal in some states.

History Of Gel Blasting And How It Got Into Australia

After the ban of airsoft in 2008, gel blasters and the game of gel blasting developed in China.

They rose up as a substitute for airsoft and foam dart guns. The popularity of gel blasters exploded in areas such as Malaysia, where airsoft-unfriendly laws prevailed.

Over the last few years there was maximum growth of gel blasters and gel blasting in Australia ‘s two prominent regions; named as South Australia and Queensland.

Prior to this gel balls were not considered ammunition and were being widely sold in commercial and household stores.

Instead, ACCC ASN/NZ 8124 classified gel blasters as legal toys for use and sale.

However, the Australian Border Force once conducted seizures on Armored Heaven’s Brad Towner, Tactical Edge’s Peter Clarke toy.

In addition, people from out of state were traveling into Queensland to buy gel blasters. But that were not legal in their own state.

Because of the realistic nature of the gel blaster, they can be easily mistaken as a real gun.

South Australia and Queensland soon had several criminal cases against people using gel blasters on pedestrians and the general public.

This might explain the strict legality surrounding gel blasters today.

RoboMaster S1, a famous ground drone by DJI, was banned while being imported to Australia, as the package contained a gel blaster.

Even today, RoboMaster S1 is not allowed to be sold in New South Wales and Victoria.

Is Gel Blasting Legal In All States?

SAPOL (South Australian Police), in October 2020, officially declared gel blasters as regulated imitation firearms, putting its possession and sale under the regulatory acts such as Firearms Regulations 2015 and 2017.

In addition, it was declared mandatory for every person to have the certification and Category. A firearm license within an amnesty period of 6 months, which commenced from October 8, 2020, and lasted till April 7, 2021.

Within those six months, if any person is unable to obtain either the license or the certification, then he/she needs to submit the unauthorized “gel blasters possessed by them ” either to a legal firearms dealer or a police station.

That effectively ended gel blasting in South Australia. All the appeals to loosen the laws and make them less stringent were ultimately rejected by the State Government.

These new regulations led to numerous protests. Queensland remained the only state in Australia where a person can use gel blasters without a license.

On jolly 3, 2021 Gel blasters were banned in Western Australia , as the realistic gel blasters are often mistaken to be real guns.

As per the law if a person is found with gel blasters in the provinces of Western Australia, he will face significant time in jail followed by a fine ranging up to $36,000.

As of December 2021, Queensland is the only state that you can own a gel blaster without applying for a license or registering the gun.

The only condition is that you have to store and transport it concealed so as not to alarm the public.

Gel Blaster Laws In Tasmania

Gel blasters are realistic-looking replicas of real guns and can be used to mislead or threaten the public.

Cases of criminals using these guns for crimes climbed. The Firearms Act 1996 of Tasmania includes strict guidelines and rules against mimic weapons.

In August 2020, the Tasmanian Police deemed a gel blaster a firearm, banned all games, and called for the surrender of all blasters.

The government mentioned that if the gel blaster completely replicates the appearance of real firearms, then the person needs to inform the government and obtain a legal license.

A proper serial number and categorization are required for the same, in the case of gel blasters.

Gel Blaster Laws In Queensland

According to Section 67, the acquisition or possession of a restricted item is prohibited and illegal in the absence of any reasonable excuse. If someone fails to comply with it, the person would be charged with 10 penalty units ($1,334.50).

The amended February 2021 laws regarding gel blasters in Queensland state.

Gel blasters are the replica of firearms and aren’t categorized under any kind of weapon or firearm.

These replica firearms need not be registered, and the person owning it doesn’t need a license. Yay!

Possession and acquisition by legitimate retail outlets or members of a gel ball club are considered reasonable.

These are a few easy stipulations. The new amendments state that when a person isn’t using gel blasters, he/she can store it safely in a box or cupboard.

According to Section 142, the gel blaster has to be stored and transported in a locked container in such a way that it is out of sight of the public. A safe place to store or transport a gel blaster can be a car boot.

Gel Blaster Laws In Western Australia

Some recent incidents with gel blasters provoked a critical police reaction.

In 2020, officers were called to 147 gel blaster incidents while a pharmacy was held up with a toy gun, resulting in a police operation that lasted hours.

Police also obtained intelligence that criminal organizations were importing gel blasters and modifying them to turn them into workable weapons.

In addition, there was significant concern that someone holding a gel blaster would be mistakenly shot by the police.

The government passed the Weapons Act in July 2021, effectively banning gel blasters and calling for the surrender of all existing blasters.

Anyone found guilty will have a fine of up to $36,000 or face three years in prison.

Of course, this sparked an outcry of dissatisfaction from gel blasting enthusiasts.

Understandably so, why should a huge group of healthy, fun-loving players get their favorite pastime taken away because of the acts of criminals and irresponsible players?

Police Minister Paul Papalia is staunchly against gel blasters. He said that gel blasting was a “tragedy waiting to happen”. Because police officers were incapable of spotting the difference between a blaster and a real gun.

Gel Blaster Laws In New South Wales

You need a license in New South Wales to own a blaster.

Blasters and BB guns, although considered toys are actually imitation firearms because of their firing mechanism.

The law doesn’t differentiate between gel blasters, air rifles and any other gun that is considered an imitation firearm.

A person acquiring or possessing either any kind of firearm or imitation firearm must carry a valid license.

According to the Firearms Act, if a person acquires or possesses any kind of firearms without authorization, he/she is liable to a fine of up to $5,500 and imprisonment ranging from 5 to 14 years.

Gel Blaster Laws In Victoria

Due to the spike in home invasions and armed robberies, gel blasters are permitted only in Victoria with a valid collectors permit.

You’ll need to join an approved participating club or re-enactment club that deals with imitation weapons.

In Victoria, multiple cases were reported regarding the usage of a gel blaster to commit a serious crime.

Police Superintendent Dan Trimble said that many blasters replicated military-style weapons and were difficult to tell from the real thing.

He said that the blasters were used to commit serious crimes like home invasions, armed robberies, sieges, assaults, and drive-by shootings.

In January 2021, Southern Cross Station in Melbourne’s Central Business District was locked down after a man was spotted with a gel blaster.

After he was arrested, the police discovered the gel blaster and described it as “almost identical” to a real gun.

In September 2021, gel blasters were effectively banned.

Penalties for possessing or using a gel blaster.

Two years imprisonment and up to 10 years for someone with a criminal record.

If a person carries a gel blaster unconcealed to the public, he is liable to up to 2 years in jail.

Pointing a gel blaster at another person with prior permission will nab you up to 7 years in jail. Yikes.

Gel Blaster Laws In South Australia

You need to have a license for using gel blaster and the registration certificate of your gel blaster.

Before October 2020, a person could freely use gel blasters in South Australia without the need for a license.

However, in October 2020, gel blasters started being recognized as imitation firearms.

In October 2020, gel blasters were categorized as regulated imitation firearms in South Australia, and subject to the control, license, and requirements under the Firearms Acts of 2015 and the Firearms Regulations of 2017.

According to updated laws, although gel blasters are legal and can be acquired and possessed in South Australia, a person needs a license.

Gel blasters are now categorized as under-regulated imitation firearms. Every aspect of the blaster, starting right from the purchase, is under the control and regulations of the South Australian Firearms Act.

You cannot own a gel blaster in South Australia without a valid firearm license. In addition, the blaster must also have legal registration documents.

South Australian residents were given a 6 month amnesty period to surrender their guns to a police station, or apply for the relevant permits.

By then, gel blasters had become a popular sport, with over 60,000 estimated blasters in South Australia alone.

South Australian Police (SAPOL)

The South Australian Police (SAPOL) directed all owners to surrender the guns or apply for the necessary licenses.

You’ll need to fill up the PD303 Application Form and submit it to the local police station with an application fee of $100 and 100 identification points.

After this, you need to wait until the approval letter asking you to undergo a TAFE course arrives. The course is for 3 hours and costs about $55.

Once done, your instructor will post the results to SAPOL.

Then, you’ll have to wait for your data card to come from the Firearms Branch and take a photo with 100 points of original identification.

An interim license will be issued once your photo has been taken, and will be valid until the photo license is issued, or for up to 90 days.

In addition, you’ll have to register your gel blaster and have a serial number imprinted.

To register your gel blaster, you have to fill the PD306 Application Form and submit it for review to the police station.

After processing, the application form along with the serial number of the firearm and approval details, will be returned.

Once returned, the serial number must be engraved on the gel blaster.

You’ll have to report to the police along with the gel blaster and the form within 14 days with a registration fee of $40.

SAPOL Firearms Branch will then send you the registration certificate within a few days.

Congratulations! You are now free to possess and use the gel blaster at designated arenas, clubs, or fields.

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Gel Blasting – Legalities Around The World

Gel Blasting

Gel blasting is a relatively new sport similar to paintball or airsoft. 

A tactical game played as a Close Quarters Battle or CQB. Gel blasting has been credited with hurting less and being more eco-friendly than the latter two.

Anyone that has been the unlucky recipient of a paintball shot can attest to the fact that it HURTS!

Gel balls hurt way less and at times, you can barely feel a shot through your clothes if taken at a further range. A close range shot might sting a tad but will rarely leave a mark.

These balls are made up of 94% to 98% water, and an eco-friendly polymer. They’ll explode on impact and can biodegrade fast, saving you some valuable cleaning time.

Sometimes played in nature, it can also be played in an enclosed arena. The plan is simple; shoot the enemy team and don’t get shot!

Gel Blasting – Legalities

However, due to the incredibly realistic nature of a gel blaster gun, crooks and irresponsible players went and spoiled it for the rest of the gel blasting community.

In 2020, officers were called to 147 gel blaster incidents in Western Australia alone, while a blaster was used to hold up a pharmacy, resulting in a police operation that lasted several hours.

Police Superintendent Dan Trimble said that blasters were used to commit serious crimes like armed robberies, assaults, drive-by shootings, and home invasions in Victoria.

Moreover, Southern Cross station in Melbourne’s Central Business District was locked down in January 2021 after a man was spotted with a blaster and bystanders mistook it for an actual gun.

Most police officers were found not to be able to tell the difference between a gel blaster and a real gun.

As the list of crimes and disturbances climbed, several states in Australia have made it illegal to own a blaster without appropriate firearm licenses and registration documents.

As of the end of 2021, the only state that you can go gel blasting without a license or restrictions is Queensland.

The only stipulation is that you have to conceal the blaster when transporting it and store it in a closed, secure location.

In which countries are Gel Blasters legal?

Argentina

Gel Blasters are legal in Argentina.

You can only buy replica or imitation firearms in gun shops or specialised sports establishments, to persons above the minimum age in Argentina. The Gel Blasters must have guidelines and warnings written in Spanish and a large “Not for use by minors” in a visible location.

Armenia

Gel Blasters are legal in Armenia.

Gel Blasters with muzzle energy below three joules, that is 568 ft/s for a 0.20 g projectile (the average weight of a gel ball), are not considered weapons in Armenia and require no licence or permission.

Belgium

Gel Blasters are legal in Belgium.

Weapons that shoot projectiles without combustion or fire are free to buy and sell as long as you are over the age of 18 in Belgium.

An exception is if the weapon can shoot a 0.2g pellet (the average weight of a gel ball) at 900fps or faster, then it is considered a firearm and has to be registered as such in Belgium.

Bulgaria

Gel Blasters are legal in Bulgaria

There is no restriction on the ownership of a Gel Blaster in Bulgaria, only a minimum age of 18.

Since they are considered air guns, not real guns, in Bulgaria, you are free to use them wherever except public areas like schools and such.

Chile

Gel Blasters are legal in Chile.

You must transport your Gel Blaster out of sight in public places. Most shops will require you to be 18 or older to purchase a Gel Blaster, but there are no laws regulating the sales in Chile.

Czech Republic

Gel Blasters are legal in Czech Republic.

In Czech Republic anyone over the age of 18 can buy and sell Gel Blasters without any licenses or permissions.

A Gel Blaster must be concealed while transported and they are not allowed in public places in Czech Republic.

Denmark

Gel Blasters are legal in Denmark

Any person above 18 years can buy and trade Gel Blasters in Denmark.

At the age of 16 they can be used on police approved sites with parents permission. Your Gel Blaster must alway be concealed while being transported in Denmark.

Finland

Gel Blasters are legal in Finland.

The only restrictions are that you must transport your Gel Blaster concealed and you need permission from a legal guardian to purchase one if you are under the age of 18 in Finland.

France

Gel Blasters are legal in France.

A Gel Blaster firing above 464 FPS (two joules with an average gel ball of 0.2 gram) is considered a firearm and will need to have proper licenses and permissions according to the French Weapons Law. You must transport your Gel Blaster concealed in France.

Germany

Some Gel Blasters are legal in Germany. But not the ones you want!

For a Gel Blaster to be unrestricted it has to shoot at 230 FPS or less. In that case it is a toy gun and can be purchased and used by anyone above 14 years in Germany. They must be concealed in public.

Any Gel Blaster shooting above 230 FPS is considered an air rifle in Germany, not a toy, and you must be 18 or older to use them.

In addition, and here’s the catch, they are illegal if they are able to shoot automatic fire. As icing on the cake, you are not allowed to even own a flashlight or laser that can be mounted on the blaster projecting light in front of it, let alone mount anything.

Then there is of course the transport issues. Concealing is not enough, if the gel blaster is similar to a real weapon it must be transported in a locked container in Germany.

Greece

Gel Blasters are legal in Greece.

A Gel Blaster is in the same category as air guns in Greece. They are not considered real guns, but can only be sold to persons of 18 years or older in special shops. The Gel Blaster is required to be concealed when transported in Greece.

Hong Kong

Gel Blasters are legal in Hong Kong.

A Gel Blaster is considered a toy in Hong Kong as long as the kinetic energy is below two joule (465 FPS) and you better stay below that limit. If you go above two joule, you have a firearm and consequences of having an illegal firearm in Hong Kong may include up to 14 years in prison.

There are no licences or permissions needed in Hong Kong for buying or trading with toy guns, and no laws requiring you to conceal the gun, although you should if it looks like a real gun.

Hungary

Gel blasters are legal in Hungary.

Gel Blasters can be bought and owned by anyone above the age of 18 years in Hungary.

Ireland

Gel Blasters are legal in Ireland.

The limit for needing a weapon license in Ireland is one joule, which is about 330 FPS with an average gel ball (0.2 grams)

Indonesia

Gel Blasters are legal in Indonesia.

There are no rules by law restricting the ownership or use of Gel Blasters in Indonesia

Italy

Gel Blasters are legal in Italy.

In Italian law, a Gel Blaster shooting with an energy of one joule (about 330 FPS with 0.2 gram gel ball) or less is considered to be a toy. They can be traded freely, both domestically and from abroad. There is no requirement for licenses or permissions, nor any age limit.

The Gel Blaster must be sold with a red tipped barrel, but it can be removed when owned. Gel Blasters must be concealed while transporting them in Italy.

Japan

Gel Blasters are legal in Japan.

There is a limit of 3.5 joule/cm2, which translates to just under one joule for a standard sized gel ball, so the limit is about 330 FPS for a Gel Blaster in Japan.

Latvia

Gel Blasters are legal in Latvia.

A Gel Blaster with muzzle energy of 1.5 joules (about 400 FPS with a standard 0.2 gram gel ball) or lower is considered a low energy air gun in Latvia and can be sold to anyone that is 18 years or older without any registration.

Lithuania

Gel Blasters are legal in Lithuania.

A Gel Blaster with muzzle energy of 1.5 joules (about 400 FPS with a standard 0.2 gram gel ball) or lower is considered a low energy air gun in Lithuania and can be sold to anyone that is 18 years or older without any registration.

Malta

Gel Blasters are legal in Malta.

In 2013 Malta amended their laws to accommodate for non-lethal guns and you do not need any license or registration to buy, own or use a Gel Blaster in Malta.

Norway

Gel Blasters are legal in Norway.

You have to be 18 years or older to buy a Gel Blaster in Norway, but you are allowed to use one at any age. However, you have to use it for personal protection and have permission from your legal guardians.

Poland

Gel Blasters are legal in Poland.

In Poland the limit for kinetic energy is 17 joule, anything above that is considered a pneumatic weapon. 17 joule is about 1350 FPS with a normal gel ball, so that should not be a problem. A Gel Blaster must be concealed in public areas in Poland.

Russia

Gel Blasters are legal in Russia.

A Gel Blaster with muzzle energy less than three joules (about 568 FPS with standard 0.2 gram gel ball) is not considered a weapon in Russia.

Serbia

Gel Blasters are legal in Serbia.

Anyone over the age of 16 may legally buy, own, and use a Gel Blaster in Serbia.

Slovakia


Gel Blasters are legal in Slovakia.

You have to be 18 years of age to use a Gel Blaster in Slovakia. You are required by law to make sure your Gel Blaster is secure, when you are not using it. The maximum energy is 15 joules, which is more than 1250 FPS with a normal 0.2 gram gel ball.

You need a weapons importation licence if you want to buy a Gel Blaster from outside the European Union.

Slovenia

Gel Blasters are legal in Slovenia.

There are no age limits for buying or using a Gel Blaster in Slovenia. But you are not allowed to carry them unconcealed in public since the police will treat them as real weapons.

Sweden

Gel Blasters are legal in Sweden.

In Sweden, a Gel Blaster will be considered a limited effect firearm. You must be 18 years or above to buy or possess one, but there are no licenses or permissions needed.

Ukraine

Gel Blasters are legal in Ukraine.

A Gel Blaster with muzzle energy less than three joules (about 568 FPS with standard 0.2 gram gel ball) is not considered a weapon in Ukraine currently.

United Arab Emirates

Gel Blasters are legal in the United Arab Emirates.

You can buy, own and possess Gel Blasters in the United Arab Emirates. Gel Blasters are sold at special weapon shops. You need a permit to import them to the United Arab Emirates.

The Gel Blaster must be concealed in public, and you can only play in designated facilities.

United Kingdom

Gel Blasters are legal in the United Kingdom.

A Gel Blaster with automatic fire can only have max muzzle energy 1.3 joules, about 375 FPS with a standard 0.2 gram gel ball for it to be legal.
A Gel Blaster that has only single fire is allowed up to 2.5 joules of energy, about 520 FPS with an average 0.2 gram gel ball.

United States

Gel Blasters are legal in the United States.

There are some different rules in different states. But in general, you should be 18 years or older to buy a Gel Blaster in the United States. The Gel Blaster should be equipped with an orange tip on the barrel. It should be to indicate that it is not a real gun in most of the United States.

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How To Get Started Get Blasting – Part 1

blasting

Gel blasting, also known as gel balling, is a tactical game played as a CQB (Close Quarters Battle), involving sticking a bunch of people in an enclosed area and having them shoot at each other.

Other similar games include paintball and airsoft guns.

First popular in China when airsoft guns were banned, gel blasting is now a popular team sport played worldwide, and fast gaining traction in Australia.

After all, what’s there not to like about a fun day out meeting friends and shooting at them?

Part One, The Noob

Gel blasting is a very intense sport, with people trying to shoot you while you do the same to them.
Gel bells hurt way less than other sports like paintball.

Made up of 94% to 98% water, these gel balls are made of an eco-friendly polymer such as sodium polyacrylate, exploding on impact and biodegrading fast.

Running, ducking and crawling through obstacles and around the arena will keep you physically active for hours.

Needless to say, the better physical shape you’re in, the better you will perform. And the more you play, the more exercise you’ll get so that works out great for your fitness!

How does a gel blaster work?

The basic function of a gel blaster is propelling a small gel ball with compressed air.

There are three methods for air compression; gas-powered, powered by electricity from a battery (AEG), or spring powered.

The gas-powered ones use compressed gas, contained in a little gas canister in the magazine with a refillable bottle.

Battery-powered AEG’s compress a spring with a small motor, while springs push the balls in a spring-powered gun.

Both AEGs and spring-powered guns utilize the compressed spring to give the gel ball the velocity.
AEGs are by far, the most common type of gel blaster gun.

So, how do you begin gel blasting?

First off, you’ll need a gel blaster of course, some gel balls and safety goggles.

The only mandatory safety equipment required is eye protection. Even though the gel balls are soft and only weigh 0.02 grams, being hit in the eye is still painful.

You can either purchase your own gel blaster, or try renting a gun in the arena in which you will be playing.

Why get your own gel blaster?

  • You can spend as much time as you need with your equipment before going to a game
  • In your own backyard, you can have a lot of fun.
  • You’re more confident because it’s yours.
  • You will already know its limitations, how to aim, and the distance it is accurate to
  • You already know how to refill the mag quickly

Why not?

  • It’ll cost you more than a rental gel blaster
  • You might get the wrong type of gun for the roles that you like playing
  • The gel blaster you’ve chosen might not suit you

Getting an inexpensive, entry-level blaster and starting blasting is a simple and enjoyable way to get into the gel blasting world.

There are affordable combo packs that offer great value, getting you into the sport with minimal financial commitment.

How to choose your first gel blaster?

As a budget first-time buy, you have the JinMing M92 Beretta, a fully automatic gun with gel balls fed by gravity through a hopper attached to the top.

In contrast, most gel blasters are fed from a magazine by a motor.

The JinMing M92 Beretta is available in a 2-pack combo for about $70.

At $35 per gun, you can not expect premium builds and limited upgrade options, but for your first gun, they’ll do the trick and you’ll have fun.

A more extensive one is this family combo deal also by JinMIng, going for $350 a package.

The package includes two M92 Berettas, an M4A1 assault rifle, and a SCAR V2 assault rifle.

Both assault rifles are fully automatic and magazine-fed. Also included in this combo pack are 50,000 gel balls, a practice target, and a couple of speed loaders.

The two assault rifles are of decent quality and can both be upgraded for speed and accuracy with more powerful batteries, stronger springs, metal gears, and hop-ups.

Getting a good quality gel blaster will be more rewarding in the long run once you quickly start to improve and require better performance.

When selecting your first gel blaster, always choose from a trusted manufacturer with a good track record. Also, evaluate:

  • Is the performance out of the box acceptable?
  • Can you upgrade performance in the future?
  • Will it fit accessories?

The manufacturers of gel blasters are usually Chinese, where gel balling became big after airsoft got banned.

Some of the more common brands that are known for their quality blasters are NWell (Newell, Well), LTD/Warinterest, JingJi, CYMA, LeHui and JinMing (JM).

Make sure you are happy with the stock performance of your gel blaster right out of the box so you don’t have to start your relationship with a technical upgrade.

However, when you get into gel balling and start improving, you’re likely to want more performance from your gel blaster so the ability to do technical upgrades is crucial.

Gel blaster accessories come in a wide range. Some improve power and accuracy, some provide lighting, or some gel balls even light up in the dark. And face it, some gun accessories just look way cool!

Having a gel blaster that these accessories can be attached to will increase the likelihood of a long and meaningful relationship with your new blaster.

Kinds of Gel Blaster

There are all kinds of gel blasters from handguns and sniper rifles to submachine guns or assault rifles.

As a beginner, the best choice for a steady companion blaster is a submachine gun (SMG) or an assault rifle.

They are the bread and butter of the game and there will always be a place for them in every team.

The main differences between an SMG and an assault rifle come from them being replicas of the original guns.

A submachine gun uses handgun ammo and an assault rifle shoots rifle ammo that has a longer range of doing some damage.

A submachine gun has a shorter barrel than the rifle and is more effective at closer range. Since the bullets are smaller, the magazine is smaller.

When a gel blaster is a smaller gun, it sacrifices accuracy and range and might have fewer gel balls in the magazine but it also allows for more agile movements for the player.

Many of the gel blasters can fit a drum magazine that holds heaps of gel balls. Have a browse at some drum magazines here.

Choosing Gel Blaster For A Beginner 

Choose the right gel blaster as your first one so you don’t have to buy a new one every time.

So, what is vital with the initial gel blaster if you want it to survive your better skill set in the future?

  • Ready to rock out of the box with no need to reassemble it at arrival.
  • Good quality, strong build that won’t fall to pieces after repeated use.
  • Readily available spare parts, as all things will break if used enough.
  • Easily upgraded to accommodate for your growing mad skills.

There are a multitude of gel blasters to select from that are suited for a first-time gel baller.

Vector v2 by LeHui

This submachine gun comes with a unique design and is made out of sturdy nylon.

The design has required a non-standard solution for the gearbox, although the components inside are standard, making it easy to upgrade and service.

It ships with an 11.1v battery, which is more than enough and probably doesn’t have to be upgraded.

Out of the box, it delivers 15 rounds per second at 220 feet per second, with an electronic fire selector that lets you choose single, burst or automatic fire.

It also comes with a flashlight and a laser sight. Transporting the Vector is easy, it’s only 55 cm long with the buttstock folded, so it’ll fit in most bags.

The Vector can take a drum magazine to increase the capacity from the stock mag’s 150 rounds to 800 to 1,000 rounds.

The Vector V2 is an excellent choice for a beginner; it’s simple to use and will last long if treated and maintained well. Check out the Vector V2 here.

MP5 by LTD/Warinterst

The MP5 is a solidly built submachine gun with a nylon body built to last.

It comes with metal inner and outer barrels, metal gears and silver wiring. Also included is a metal, in-barrel, hop up and a drum magazine holding around 300 gel balls.

It will hit accurately up to 20 meters, has a rate of fire of 19 rounds per second, with the velocity of 250 feet per second.

Also with a 11.1v battery, that’s one thing that doesn’t have to be upgraded.

The MP5 has 14 mm reverse thread on the end of the barrel for attachments and a pretty cool flashlight can be a replacement handguard.

You can find the MP5 by LTD here.

SLR CQB by JingJi

This SLR CQB (Close Quarter Battle) is a strong construction made of solid nylon.

The folding buttstock has a velcro brace so you can strap it to your forearm, allowing you to run around spraying gel balls while still having one arm free.

The stock performance is great, firing at a velocity of up to 240 feet per second.

The rate of fire is about 15 rounds per second and the firing distance is around 25 meters.

This assault rifle comes with metal gears, 11.1 volt battery, metal inner and outer barrels and a full-length tactical rail for accessories on top.

This is one of the most common types of gel blaster at the moment with heaps of tactical accessories available if you want to customize it.

Upgrading for higher performance is easy. While most components are standard, the majority of this gun’s parts are already metal and will not require upgrading, so you should be set for a bit.

Get the Jingji SLR-CQB with Metal Gears and start blasting!

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